Lektsii o rabotie glavnikh pishtshevaritelnikh zhelyos.

St. Petersburg: I. N. Kushnereff & Ko. 1897.

A fine copy, in contemporary Russian binding, of this famous work on digestive juices by the demonstrator of the ‘conditioned reflex’.

❧PMM 385; Grolier/Horblit 83; Dibner 135; Grolier/Medicine 85; Lilly Library Notable Medical Books 241.

“Mouth-watering is a familiar experience and may be induced without the sight or smell of food. The sounds of a table being laid for lunch in another room may induce salivation in man, and the rattle of a dish in which its food is usually served will cause similar reaction in a dog.

“By detailed analysis of such facts as these Pavlov made great contributions to our knowledge of the physiology of digestion in a series of lectures delivered in St Petersburg and published in the following year [i.e., the offered work]. In the course of these lectures he described the artificial stomach for dogs used by him to produce for the first time gastric juices uncontaminated by food. Further experiments led him to the conclusion that salivation and the flow of gastric juice ensuing upon the sight or smell of food was due to a reflex process. This simple form of reaction he called first a ‘psychic’, later an ‘unconditioned’, reflex. Reflex action was familiar to physiologists, but it had never been invoked to explain such a complicated process.

“Pavlov now set himself to discover the far more complicated process involved in the evocation of gastric responses to stimuli other than food, for example the rattle of a familiar platter. This was in the nature of an acquired stimulus and as reflex action was induced by a particular condition or set of conditions he called it a ‘conditioned’ reflex. From a series of experiments increasingly detailed, and a tabulation of results increasingly exact, he found that virtually any natural phenomenon may be developed into a conditioned stimulus to produce the selected response — ‘The Activity of the Digestive Glands’. All that was necessary was to submit the animal to the selected stimulus at feeding time and the stimulus would eventually cause salivation in the absence of food.

“The elaboration of these experiments and their extension to children demonstrated how great a proportion of human behaviour is explicable as a series of conditioned reflexes. Indeed some psychologists seem nowadays to believe that behaviour is all. Pavlov’s results are, indeed, clearly complementary to those of Freud and many regard them as of more fundamental significance. Like Freaud’s, this was the work of one man and a completely new departure. Pavlov was awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 1905.” (Printing and the Mind of Man).

8vo (184 x 130 mm), pp. [vi], ii, 223, [1], contemporary Russian brown half calf with gilt spine lettering in cyrillic, initials B.C. of previous owner gilt at bottom of spine. Signature of, dated 1902, to front fly leaf, old Russian booksellers A very fine copy, completely unrestored copy in it's original state.

Item #4196

Price: $20,000.00